Poetry · Speaker

Poet Switch: Introducing Ciera Smith

Spoken-Word Poet Ciera Smith

Anita Scott will not be able to join us in November, but please pray for her as she is completing graduate school with the hope of becoming a principal! Which would be the coolest school ever.

We want to gather talent locally, diligently searching for women who are furthering the kingdom with their words, their art, their very presence.

I reached out to Rediet Mulugeta of Mission Year (check them out!) and asked her if she knew any spoken-word poets she could throw my way. She did!

Ciera Smith, a Chicago transplant from Philadelphia, has a passion for youth, teaching, and writing. A Spring 2014 graduate of the University of Maryland—College Park, she received her B.A. in English. Immediately following graduation, she went on to do Mission Year in the East Garfield Park neighborhood of Chicago’s west side. It is here where she fell in love with the neighborhood and grew a passion for investing and walking along side the youth that she was serving.

She is currently studying Urban Studies and Youth Development at Eastern University where she will graduate in the Spring. She is also currently a lead teacher for the 7th and 8th grade classroom at Breakthrough Urban Ministries in their after-school program as well as on staff with Mission Year as their recruitment assistant. Ciera finds joy in writing, cooking, checking out new coffee shops and restaurants in the city, and spending time with friends.

 

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Art & Design · Poetry · Speaker · Video · Worship

Deeply Rooted Invitation Video

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Lord, how long must I wait? Will you forget me forever? How long will you turn your face away from me? How long must I struggle with my thoughts? How long must my heart be sad day after day? How long will my enemies keep winning the battle over me? LORD my God, look at me and answer me. Give me new life, or I will die. Then my enemies will say, “We have beaten him.” They will be filled with joy when I die. But I trust in your faithful love. My heart is filled with joy because you will save meI will sing to the Lord. He has been so good to me. ~Psalm 13: 1-6 

This powerful Psalm resonates with so many of us because it reflects our own heart and mind. Sometimes we’re waiting for God to give us something we want, but we’re also waiting for him to take things away from us. God calls us to our own Garden of Gethsemane where we cry, pray, and wait for him to take the cup from us.

Waiting well is a challenge for all of us. How do we do it gracefully? Prayerfully? How do we sustain hope in the “oil press” of our own lives? We’re asking the same questions. Join us as we explore together—through poetry, worship, teaching, and workshops— what it means to wait expectantly with a heart full of joy.

Faith · Poetry · Speaker

Speakers for November 2017

The main reason we gather women together is to provide teaching that is biblically sound, accessible, engaging, challenging, and inspiring. We pray hard about who to invite and spend a lot of time looking for gifted local women who have wisdom, integrity, and a heart for reaching and encouraging others.

We are so excited for this lineup and know these women will bring you Gospel truth with a side of humor and draw you closer to Jesus and one another. We will be introducing each of these women in separate posts.

ANITA SCOTT

Our dear friend Anita Scott will be joining us again with her incredibly moving spoken-word poetry. Anita has become a mainstay of Deeply Rooted in November.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KATHY KHANG

Also back by popular demand is Kathy Khang who will be opening our gathering on Friday night! Kathy currently serves as a regional multiethnic ministries director with InterVarsity Christian Fellowship (IVCF)/USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KIMBERLY PENROD PELLETIER

Kimberly Pelletier is a trained spiritual director, writer, and Director of Soul Care at Mansio Center in Glen Ellyn, IL. She blogs about grief, spiritual formation, and sexuality at kimberlypenrodpelletier.com. With the rest of her time, Kimberly can be found wearing a tool belt, brewing kombucha, or traipsing around the woods with her husband and three kids.

RAMELIA WILLIAMS

Ramelia Williams is currently in the call process, having recently earned a Master of Divinity degree and Certificate in Spiritual Direction from North Park Theological Seminary.
Poetry · Speaker

May Speaker: Katelyn Durst

 

Katelyn Durst is a poet, community artist, creative activist, teacher and youth worker. Katelyn hails from the northern coast of the Great Lake State. She has worked within urban youth development and urban community development for ten years in cities such as Chicago, Denver, DC, LA, Seattle and Flint (MI) . Additionally, she has taught poetry for six years and recently conducted poetry therapy workshops at a youth psychiatric hospital and Freedom Schools summer programming in a workshop focused on healing from the unjust deaths of youth of color

Katelyn is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Urban Studies and Community Arts from Eastern University. This program focuses on trauma-informed art-making to build sustainable and transformative resiliency within urban/inner-city and displaced communities. As an artist-in-residence with Flint Public Art Project, she is developing a narrative community arts project that will give voice to family stories as they process and grow through the current state of the water crisis. She continues to work as a poetry teacher and is additionally developing a food literacy curriculum for Flint schools.

Her poems have appeared in Controlled Burn, The Lightkeeper, Deep Fried Poetry, The Offbeat, Teen Ink, New Poetry Magazine and are forthcoming in Tayo Literary Magazine and the Primal School Blog. In her spare time, Katelyn She dreams of her next great adventure and becoming an urban beekeeper.

Check out one of her poems on The Mudroom!

Community · Faith · Poetry · Speaker · Video

Deeply Rooted Coming Soon!!

Deeply Rooted is two months from today!! We’re so excited to announce our speakers for May and show you our new video.

 

Katelyn Durst is a community artist, creative activist, teacher and youth worker. She has worked within urban youth development and urban community development for ten years and has taught poetry for six years, recently conducting poetry therapy workshops at a youth psychiatric hospital and Freedom Schools summer programming in a workshop focused on healing from the unjust deaths of youth of color. Katelyn is currently pursuing a master’s in Urban Studies and Community Arts from Eastern University with a focus on trauma-informed art-making to build sustainable and transformative resiliency within urban/inner-city and displaced communities. In her spare time, she dreams of becoming an urban beekeeper. She is a poet-in-residence at The Mudroom.

 

 

 

Nilwona Nowlin is a redemptive artist, someone who believes in the power of the arts to bring about positive transformation in individuals and communities. She is particularly passionate about helping people discover/pursue their purpose, leadership development, and ministries of compassion, mercy, and justice such as community development, reconciliation, and intercultural development. She is a regular contributor for the Evangelical Covenant Church (ECC) Commission on Biblical Gender Equality’s blog and the lmdj Voices blog of the ECC’s Love Mercy Do Justice mission priority. Nilwona earned a B.A. from Columbia College Chicago, an M.A. in Christian Formation and Certificate in Justice Ministry from North Park Theological Seminary and a Master’s in Nonprofit Administration from North Park University. She blogs at thedreamerspeaks.com.

 

 

Lina AbuJamra is a Pediatric ER doctor and founder of Living with Power Ministries. Her deepest desire is to help people live with power by connecting Biblical answers to everyday life. Though Lina still practices medicine, she spends the majority of her time speaking and writing providing Biblical truth for every day life. She has authored Thrive: the Single Life as God Intended, Stripped: When God’s Call Turns from Yes to Why Me?, and Resolved: 10 Ways to Stand Strong and Live What You Believe.

You can hear Lina daily on Moody Radio hosting Today’s Single Christian, or listen to her popular Living with Power podcast reaching thousands of people globally. Lina’s most recent work has taken her back to the Middle East and her birth country, Lebanon, where she is provides medical care for Syrian refugees. Born in Beirut, Lebanon, Lina now calls Chicago home. She is single and a huge Packers fan – not that the two are connected. Lina loves her coffee black and her iPhone always.

Click here to register!

Community · Poetry · Speaker · Worship

Who is Mending Your Soul?

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“Experiencing a taste of heaven” is how I would describe the Deeply Rooted gathering on May 21. Truthfully, there were a host of reasons that could have kept me away. The month of May filled up with plenty of obligations. Thankfully, my husband encouraged me to make room for it. I even invited a friend! Forgetting to care for our own soul becomes tempting as we get in the habit of caring for others. Yet, we must be cautious that we don’t become parched and undernourished. We must find ways of keeping our roots sustained.  The Deeply Rooted gathering did just that.

People worship our Creator in a variety of ways. The blessing that came through this gathering was the  variety of worship forms through which the voice of God spoke. The songs, though familiar, took on a different perspective in this venue. Despite our differences and  our church backgrounds, we were singing common music. The instruments may have been different (which I love) but the language was understood by all.

Intermingled with worship through music were speakers Rev. Dr. Velda Love, June Felix, and a poet Elyssa Salinas. We are all blessed when the Holy Spirit uses our unique gifts and talents to be manifest. I felt the characters come to life as she became their voices. In particular, I was impacted by the narrative of Hagar. So often the story is told of Abraham and Hagar takes a minor; if not scandalous part. Here, Hagar spoke of what was forced upon her. An act, which truthfully, is criminal by our standards. The pain, the humiliation, and despair she felt as she was cast away from the family that no longer had “need” of her was deep. Yet, in the midst of it, she is reminded that she is not invisible; she is not a label. She is known by and loved by her Creator.

June challenged the listeners to embrace the wonder of God. She drew us in by sharing a bit of her personal story involving her mother who had recently passed. She was left with unanswered questions regarding her mother’s life. Not having answers can leave us unsettled yet we’re reminded throughout scripture of the mysteries of God. For example, as she pointed out, many people know John 3:16 by heart; however, John 3:7-8 is not a popular memorized passage. June stated that “trusting God requires learning how to be comfortable with the ‘unknown knowns.’”  “Unknown knowns” are the promises of God as revealed through scripture and a personal relationship. I appreciated her reminder that God gives just what we need for the moment. So often, I think of the “what ifs” down the road but forget that God’s already holding onto that for me. In a humorous illustration, our life hidden in Christ was compared to a “Turducken.” The closing challenge confronted our own legacy. By embracing the “unknown knowns,” others may look at our life and wonder “Who is this Jesus?”

Rev. Dr. Velda Love’s presentation exhorted women to reclaim their true identities. She began by referencing the choreopoem “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf.” Written by Ntozake Shange, the poem (and play) “is concerned with the victimization of women and with finding the young black woman’s voice and self.” The characters’ narratives bring a voice to both the individual and collective suffering at the hands of those in power. By expressing verbally and orally the violence against them as black women, they fight to break up a system that has perpetuated the oppression. Rev. Dr. Love asked us to consider what our own play would be called. Furthermore, the challenge lies in asking ourselves questions such as, “Who writes your story?” “Who has power over your existence?” “Who is mending your soul?” Such significant questions, but how often do we ask them? The answers have implications concerning how we view faith, our understanding of scripture, how we view God, and our relationship to others.

As we examined key passages, Rev. Dr. Love deconstructed common interpretations and provided historical and literal background. So much of what we come to understand biblically has its roots in source materials written in patriarchal societies. All miss out on the full implications of scripture when it is viewed through a lens that is skewed.  Acknowledgement of that truth is necessary to embracing our identity as God’s creation.   The coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost “is a sign and message to women; you are empowered by God to be whole, to speak and create, to worship, and not fear or feel threatened by life or life’s circumstances.” The Holy Spirit does not differentiate. That is reason to rejoice!

My friend and I are still basking in the glory of the Deeply Rooted gathering.  The beauty of the Holy Spirit is manifest in the deepening of our relationships to each other as we are nourished individually. The insight gained from that evening continues to feed our conversations. Speaking of feeding, treats are always an appreciated part of any gathering. The hospitality was appreciated—not only did it allow for more opportunity to engage but the yummy snacks were a simple gesture of sharing God’s love. I’m quite sure my friend and I received an abundance of it! I look forward to the next Deeply Rooted gathering and more connections to feed my hungry soul.

Poetry · Speaker · Video

Rev. Dr. Velda Love: May 2016

“Black feminist discourse of power in Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf  depicts the struggle of black women through a rainbow of experiences.  The chorepoem focuses on how the patriarchal discourse leads to their suffering and how they were able to claim back their identities as black females who only need to be loved and appreciated. Shange’s poetry expresses the many struggles and obstacles that African- American women face throughout their lives.”

Many of us white women can relate on a smaller, safer scale. We are experiencing and recovering from similar traumas; assault, depression, abuse, diminishment, voicelessness, loss of identity. Velda widens the scope to one that includes us all and suggests we title our own stories and offers suggestions:

WRITE YOUR OWN PLAY . . . THESE TITLES MAY OR MAY NOT FIT

  1. For Women Who Consider Asphyxiation When Trauma Overwhelms Your Soul
  2. For Women Who Want to Run Away from Home When the Covenant Binds You
  3. For Women Who Trust Other Women Only to Get Used and Broken
  4. For Women Who Live in Community But Find Themselves Isolated and Lonely
  5. For Women Who Give and Give and Give and Give and Find Themselves Empty
  6. For Women Who Want to Re-Write the Rules When Men Are Clueless and God is Silent
  7. For Women Who Smile and Smile and Smile, But Are Weeping and Crying, Sobbing, and Wailing on the Inside
  8. For Women Who Ask Permission to Speak But Never Get to Speak
  9. For Women Who are Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired
  10. For Women Who Never Get to Hear The Bible From a Woman’s Perspective
  11. For Women Who Are Know What Freedom Is And Are Willing to Empower and Free Others
  12. Velda offers us encouragement and hope and commissions us to find our truest, deepest selves.